Strength to Heal

Our Facility and Amenities

Sana sits on 4.25 acres of private, beautifully landscaped wooded area in the Green Mountains of Stowe, Vermont. Just outside our doors are stunning views, tennis courts, a swimming pool, fitness studio, serenity walk and hiking trails.

The building itself has been newly renovated and designed in collaboration with a leading addiction psychiatrist and award-winning architectural firm specializing in healthcare design with the goal of providing a safe, comfortable environment ideal for those in early recovery.

Our four distinct seasons offer a variety of indoor and outdoor activities. Whether you want to cozy up by the fire or go snowshoeing, get your hands dirty in our vegetable garden, practice yoga in the sun, or watch the leaves turn brilliant shades of autumn, we can accommodate you. We understand that recovery means finding joy again in everyday life and having fun is an integral part of the process.

Cuisine

Sana’s cuisine was designed to nourish and heal. Using principles of integrative health and nutritional psychiatry, our food reflects the fundamental idea that there is a relationship between what you eat, how you feel and how you ultimately behave.

The menu was created in collaboration with an award-winning chef and a Doctor of Nursing, who specializes in nutrition and addiction. Our kitchen is run by Jade Quagliozzi, who has spent years perfecting her culinary and horticultural skills in top-level restaurants and farms in Vermont and the Boston area.

In addition to three daily meals, Sana has a coffee bar, a smoothie station and offers snacks throughout the day and night.

Fitness and Activities

Our fitness and yoga studio is equipped with a range of cardio machines, nautilus equipment and free weights. Yoga classes are held daily. We also have a swimming pool, tennis courts and a serenity walk.

Executive Workspace

Our program is customized to meet the unique needs and challenges of executives and professionals in the legal, medical and financial fields. We understand how difficult it is to ask for help because of stigma and fear of negative consequences in the workplace, and we also know how disruptive it can be to leave work for a period of time while engaging in treatment.

Sana’s concierge services can be built around your needs and work commitments, so that your time away from home and the office is kept to a minimum. We also have an executive workspace onsite with a computer, printer, scanner, fax and phone to ensure you can stay in touch and connected.

Selected Artwork for Sana

(June – Sept 2021)

You can choose the painting that will be in your room from a collection of over 40 paintings from Vermont artists. Here is a selection of artwork.

Nancy Calicchio

oil on canvas

In her paintings, Calicchio seeks to capture the great beauty of Vermont’s landscape. Her paintings reveal both her fascination with the natural world—sky, mountains, hills, brooks and streams, trees and fields—and her interest in working farms. Painting outside in every season is a way of probing this world, of engaging all her senses in the scene. When she sets up her easel, she searches for the play of light, for it is light and shadow that shape the form and light that reveals the color. She feels that when she is truly engaged in what she is painting, she becomes part of it. It is her greatest desire that this feeling will resonate through the painting to the viewer and bring to life the beauty and joy of our landscape.

In these square format paintings, many of which are painted in the studio, Calicchio explores the relationship between earth and sky. She invites the viewer to feel the long view of the overlapping hills and the mysterious ambiguity of the far horizon as she searches to create the illusion of depth on a flat surface.

Adrienne Ginter

hand-cut paper & archival foam core

Ginter’s approach to making art is that of an exploration into the reoccurring oddities and subtle fascinations of the natural world. The uniqueness of it all provides her with aesthetic inspiration, and she draws parallels between these narratives and the stories of human beings- whether from ancient myths, history, or her own personal experiences.

Every scene in nature tells a million little stories, and she works to incorporate an extreme amount of detail to tell not only the macro, but the micro stories in a scene. This gives the viewer a greater sense of depth, not only visually, but narratively, depending on how close they choose to engage with the piece.

Reverberate

ekovisions.com

Kelly O’Neal

photographs

Photographer, traveler, data nerd, foodie, geographer, dog lover, sunset enthusiast: Kelly O’Neal creates ethereal, painterly photographs of the beauty of place. Unlike most photographers, she seeks to move the camera during exposure, relying on years of practice to create the look she wants on her digital film. Rather than documenting what your eyes directly see, she captures colors & shapes and seeks to evoke the essence of a locale and its quintessential moments.

Sara Katz

mixed media on paper

Mark-making and color are the driver of Katz’s painting practice. While she often begins referencing subject matter from a photograph she’s taken or found, she is more concerned with the marks inspired than the documentation of the object or place. She works between multiple pieces at a time, transferring marks and processes learned from one to the next through the layering of paint, graphite, pastel and colored pencils, and edits frequently with large brushstrokes. The immediate, abstract, and wordless practice of painting balances her more measured, verbal life in the office and the community, and exercises a mind that requires contrast of experience.

Evening Beach

medusastudio.com

Julia Purinton

oil on canvas

Purinton’s landscape paintings represent her effort to depict the essence of a place or moment in nature through the evocation of her memories of that place, rather than through the faithful reproduction of specific landmarks. She relies on photographs as a form of note-taking, and along with quick sketches and occasional on-site studies, she uses photos to compose each painting in the studio as a composite image.

She works in the hope that viewers will also be moved by these images and reminded of the importance of a diverse environment to our physical health, our psychological well-being, and our future as humans on our remarkable planet. Each of her paintings is a meditation, and a little prayer.

Joie de Vivre

cameronschmitz.com

Cameron Schmitz

oil and mixed media on canvas

Schmitz uses mark-making to express the constantly moving, changing, and morphing of life and nature, leaving observers certain that they are witnessing merely a fleeting moment in time. She is fascinated by the imagery that emerges from the physical and emotive act of painting itself—dashes of paint, gestural strokes, and rhythmic painterly marks are representative of human touch, personal exchange, energy, and the shifting of time. Painting is a metaphor for her perception of life, inspired by tender, emotional relationships, and rooted in notions of touch, love, and wonder that she experiences as a woman, mother, and humble observer of the world.

Her pathway into abstraction stems from her background in both landscape and figurative painting—she has always been fascinated by gesture and the human aspects of nature, such as the way tree branches appear to reach out to each other, as if yearning to touch and hold hands. Schmitz has found that being a parent has heightened her senses and her desire to move beyond literal forms and clarified her artistic motivation to express joy, wonder, and a contented unknowing about life, which is messy and intense but always potent with exceptional beauty. It is this uncertainty she embraces while painting intuitively and abstractly because it allows her to relinquish control and give way for the painting to become a dialogue between her, the material, and its viewers.

Dianne Shullenberger

colored pencil & watercolor

Dianne Shullenberger creates intimate fabric landscapes, natural object sculptures and colored pencil drawings. In her fiber artwork, Dianne uses hundreds of pieces of fabric and fiber scraps to convey the random beauty and mystery of nature. Her sculptures reflect the grace of natural shapes while incorporating elements such as feathers, rocks, leaves, pods and sticks. A passionate outdoor woman, Dianne’s art reflects the places she loves.

Dianne is most inspired by being outdoors and experiencing the atmosphere of a place. She wants to capture a moment in nature that may pass and keep it alive in her memory and experience it again as she looks at her work. She focuses on nature studies with close-up views concentrating on details. She photographs or does colored pencil drawings on location and translates them into fabric collages or colored pencil pieces.  Dianne has a passion for artistic re-use. She grew up surrounded by her mother’s fashion design work. Today, her collection of fabrics speaks of this history and provides a treasure trove for new works.

Mike Sipe

photographs

The Lake Champlain region is Mike’s unparalleled muse; the beauty of the lake, skies, mountains, valley and the people enjoying its splendor. He doesn’t have to travel the world to find world-class beauty; it is here, in his own back yard. His ability to find the area’s essence is evolving and it is exhilarating to him.

Sipe loves to capture vistas with just the right light accenting a center of interest, the effects of natural elements and motion, and when he finds a wide tonal range, the elegant impression of black and white. His objective is using natural light in capturing gifts of images, by being in the right place at the right time with the right equipment, which evoke a magical light and an interesting confluence of elements.